Summer Safety Tips: Sun and Water Safety

Posted on June 04, 2016 by Beach Bum @ The Beach Company | 0 Comments

​Keep your family safe this summer by following these tips from The Beach Company

Fun in the Sun!

Babies under 6 months:

Our two main recommendations to prevent sunburn are to avoid sun exposure, and to dress infants in lightweight long pants, long-sleeved shirts, and brimmed hats that shade the neck to prevent sunburn. However, when adequate clothing and shade are not available, parents can apply a minimal amount of sunscreen with at least 15 SPF (sun protection factor) to small areas, such as the infant's face and the back of the hands. If an infant gets sunburn, apply cool compresses to the affected area.

For all other children:

The first, and best, line of defense against harmful ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure is covering up. Stay in the shade whenever possible, and limit sun exposure during the peak intensity hours - between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.
Wear a hat with a three-inch brim or a bill facing forward, sunglasses (look for sunglasses that provide 97% -100% protection against both UVA and UVB rays), and clothing with a tight weave.

On both sunny and cloudy days use a sunscreen with an SPF 15 or greater that protects against UVA and UVB rays. Be sure to apply enough sunscreen -- about one ounce per sitting for a young adult. Reapply sunscreen every two hours, or after swimming or sweating.

Use extra caution near water and sand (and even snow!) as they reflect UV rays and may result in sunburn more quickly.

Pool Safety

Never leave children alone in or near the pool or spa, even for a moment; close supervision by a responsible adult is the best way to prevent drowning in children.
Whenever children under age 5 are in or around water, an adult – preferably one who knows how to swim and perform CPR – should be within arm's length, providing "touch supervision."

Keep rescue equipment (a shepherd's hook ­– a long pole with a hook on the end — and life preserver) and a portable telephone near the pool. Choose a shepherd's hook and other rescue equipment made of fiberglass or other materials that do not conduct electricity.

Avoid inflatable swimming aids such as "floaties." They are not a substitute for approved life vests and can give children and parents a false sense of security.
Children over age 1 may be at a lower risk of drowning if they have had some formal swimming instruction. However, there is no evidence that swimming lessons or water survival skills courses can prevent drowning in babies younger than 1 year of age.

The decision to enroll a child over age one in swimming lessons should be made by the parent based on the child's developmental readiness and exposure to water, but swim programs should never be seen as "drown proofing" a child of any age.

Share safety instructions with family, friends and neighbors.

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